DRAMATIC ART


DRAM 120: Play Analysis

Currently Offered:
Summer 2019 (11 weeks: May 15–July 30)

DRAM 120 is the first course in the major and the minor in dramatic art. It emphasizes development of the skill to analyze plays for academic and production purposes through the intensive study of representative plays.

This course is designed to hone your skill in understanding how plays work—essential knowledge for theatre practitioners, but illuminating for any spectator or reader of drama. The ultimate goal is to develop the capacity to look at any play and get to know it on its own terms before bringing the power of interpretation to take the script from “page to stage.”

We will study intensely five classics of the Western dramatic canon—Oedipus RexHamletThe Glass MenagerieThe Cherry Orchard, and The Importance of Being Earnest—using these texts to help us peer more deeply into the principles of dramatic storytelling. Students will choose one of two modern plays and apply the skills learned to an individual project that involves both critical analysis and creative interpretation.

You can find information on how to purchase textbooks and required materials on the Textbooks page of the Friday Center website.

Course Details

  • Instructor: Mark Perry, MFA
  • Department: Dramatic Art
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • View a sample course syllabus for the online course.

How to Enroll »


DRAM 284: Studies in Dramatic Theory and Criticism

Currently Offered:
2nd Summer Session 2019 (5½ weeks: June 24–July 30)
Fall Semester 2019 (August 20–December 13)

DRAM 284 is a seminar in dramatic theory and criticism with emphasis on the modern period.

Required Texts/Materials

  • Barranger, Understanding Plays, 3rd edition (2004), ISBN 978-0205381906

  • Stoppard, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead (1994), ISBN 978-0802132758

  • Shepard, Fool for Love, (1996), ISBN 978-0822204152

  • Vogel, How I Learned to Drive, revised edition (1999), ISBN 978-0822216230

  • Pinter, The Birthday Party, 1994, ISBN 978-0802151148

Students must obtain the edition of the Barranger text indicated above. Students may use any modern edition of the plays; however, for ease of discussion and uniformity in the course, the instructor recommends the editions and translations listed.

You can find information on how to purchase textbooks and required materials on the Textbooks page of the Friday Center website.

Course Details

  • Instructor: Aubrey Snowden
  • Department: Dramatic Art
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • View a sample course syllabus for the online course.

How to Enroll »


Online Orientation

Online orientation

Whether you’re enrolled or just thinking about taking a course, this orientation will show you how Friday Center online courses work. GET ORIENTED »