POLITICAL SCIENCE


POLI 100: Introduction to Government in the United States

Currently Offered:
Summer 2019 (11 weeks: May 15–July 30)
Spring Semester 2019 (January 9 - May 7)

This course is a general introduction to government and politics in the United States. We will examine government from both normative and empirical perspectives. How should our government function, and how does it function in reality? As a society, how close have we come to the ideal of a representative democracy in which citizens are informed, politically active, and heard on an equal basis? How can we move closer to that ideal? We will attempt to answer these questions through the study of American political institutions and political behavior.

After taking this course, you should have a

  • clear understanding of the founding principles of American government
  • firm grasp on the institutional makeup of American government, both in theory and in practice
  • sense of the actual and potential roles that citizens can play in American government and politics
  • healthy skepticism about politics, particularly when you encounter public opinion poll results, campaign advertising, and media coverage of politics.

You can find information on how to purchase textbooks and required materials on the Textbooks page of the Friday Center website.

Course Details

  • Instructor: Amy Sentementes, MA
  • Department: Political Science
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • View a sample course syllabus for the online course.

How to Enroll »


POLI 101: State and Local Government in the United States

Currently Offered:
1st Summer Session 2019  (5½ weeks: May 15- June 20)
2nd Summer Session 2019 (5½ weeks: June 24–July 30)
Spring Semester 2019 (January 9 - May 7)

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the politics of state and local governments through the prism of political science. At the course’s conclusion, students should be able to identify and discuss the operation of major political actors and institutions common to many political situations in the American states and their constituent subdivisions. Moreover, students should develop a reasonably comprehensive framework to analyze and understand political systems and information that may fall beyond the scope of this course. As such, this course will encompass a basic introduction to the field of political science. This material will also serve as an important foundation for students who pursue more advanced studies in political science.

You can find information on how to purchase textbooks and required materials on the Textbooks page of the Friday Center website.

Course Details

  • Instructor: Steven Sparks, MA
  • Department: Political Science
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • View a sample course syllabus for the online course.

How to Enroll »


POLI 150: International Relations and World Politics

Currently Offered:
Summer 2019 (11 weeks: May 15–July 30)
Spring Semester 2019 (January 9 - May 7)

The objectives of this course are three-fold:

  • to introduce students to the central concepts of and analytical approaches to the study of international politics
  • to apply those ideas to historical and current international events
  • to provide students with a foundation of basic knowledge and skills that will enable them to analyze and digest information about international issues outside of the context of the class.

This class will teach students how to think about international politics theoretically, and in so doing improve their understanding of a seemingly random and accidental world. Upon completion of this course, student will have the tools to engage rather than simply accept international events.

Required Texts/Materials

You can find information on how to purchase textbooks and required materials on the Textbooks page of the Friday Center website.

Course Details

  • Instructor: Frederico Fuchs
  • Department: Political Science
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • View a sample course syllabus for the online course.

How to Enroll »


POLI 239: Introduction to European Government

Currently Offered:
Summer 2019 (11 weeks: May 15–July 30)
Spring Semester 2019 (January 9 - May 7)

The course looks at the political institutions and processes of Western European democracies, with special attention to France, Germany, England, and Italy.

Please note that Representative Government in Modern Europe is not available in the UNC Student Stores. You may still enroll in this course if you can purchase it elsewhere. Check the ISBN to make sure you are purchasing the correct edition.

Course Details

  • Instructor: Guzel Garifullina, MA
  • Department: Political Science
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • View a sample course syllabus for the online course.

How to Enroll »


POLI 271: Modern Political Thought

Currently Offered:
Summer 2019 (11 weeks: May 15–July 30)
Spring Semester 2019 (January 9 - May 7)

People living in the United States today have formed similar or shared opinions about the nature of human beings, what liberty and equality mean, what the ends of government should be, and, given those ends, how government ought to be structured. Few dispute, for example, the United States’ philosophical commitment to “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” for all of its citizens. Far from being isolated in time, however, these opinions are shaped by a long history of scholars thinking and writing about politics—we are the heirs to this tradition of modern political thought. The purpose of this course will be to learn about that inheritance.

You can find information on how to purchase textbooks and required materials on the Textbooks page of the Friday Center website.

Course Details

  • Instructor: Paul John-Petrash, MA
  • Department: Political Science
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • View a sample course syllabus for the online course.

How to Enroll »


Online Orientation

Online orientation

Whether you’re enrolled or just thinking about taking a course, this orientation will show you how Friday Center online courses work. GET ORIENTED »